How to Completely Defeat a Scaled Athlete

Today is Saturday, my last day in the box was Wednesday which is when my soul was crushed by a soul crushing WOD.  Now, I’m all for the occasional soul crusher but what made this WOD particularly terrible was that no scaling was permitted on one of the WOD components – the sled push (the other components were thrusters and sit ups for a total of five rounds).   The sleds were set up with male and female RX weights (female was 115#) which is crazy heavy for me and conditions were less than favorable as the surface we were pushing the sleds on was super sticky having just been resurfaced.  Between the super heavy RX weight and the sticky surface, it took me about 5-7 minutes to do one 150ft sled push (time cap was 20 minutes).  So in a workout that required 100 thrusters, 150 sit-ups and 5 150ft sled pushes,  I ended up doing 2 150 ft sled pushes, 21 thrusters, 60 sit-ups which is only 381 of the programmed 1000 reps ((150×5) + (20×5) +(30×5)).  

So, here’s where my knowledge of scaling fails me – which situation is better: 

1.  Do the RX weight on the sled, struggle bus through the workout,  complete less than half the reps and then be so sore and defeated that you really don’t want to go back to the gym for the next 3 days?  Or: 

2.  Scale the sled push, get more reps with a more consistent effort across all WOD components, and still feel the soul crushing but use it as motivation to get better the next time? 

I realize the defeat feeling probably varies person to person but as far as effort goes I think it would be best to scale for consistent, doable effort across the WOD components so you’re not spending an large amount of time on one part of the WOD and clogging up a fairly limited resource as sleds are limited in number anyway (don’t get me started on my thoughts to capping class numbers). 

I should have asked to scale the sled push but instead I just suffered.  Never be afraid to ask to scale, you’re probably paying a good amount of money to be training where you are and coaches should know your abilities, they may push you sometimes but don’t be afraid to verbalize your limits.  Better to be a little embarrassed in the moment than feel completely defeated (or, heaven forbid,  suffer an injury) for the next few days. It’s okay to scale and no one sound feel ashamed or embarrassed to do so. 

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